A. Dana Weber

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German

Assistant Professor
A. Dana Weber is an Assistant Professor of German. She earned her PhD in Germanic Studies and Folklore at Indiana University Bloomington in 2010. She is currently working at a book manuscript on German Wild West festivals. D. Weber also serves as the German program’s study-abroad adviser and a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Research Ambassador.

Research Interest

Performance, theatre, festival in contemporary German culture
Cultural transfers, hybridity, ethnic representation and mimicry in theatrical performance and cinema
Folklore and literature

Courses Taught

Fairy-Tales and Society
German Fantasies of Native America
German Film and Conversation
German Essay Writing
German Literature in Translation
Germanic Myths in Modern Culture
German Novellas of Realism
Heroes and Tricksters
Performances of Otherness
Western Stereotypes of Germany and Eastern Europe

Selected Publications

  • “Of Handshakes and Dragons: Django’s German Cousins.” Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained.’ The Continuation of Metacinema. Ed. Oliver Speck. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. 51-73.
  •  “Staged Indians: Native Americans in German Theatre and Karl-May-Festivals.” Visual Representations of Native Americans: Transnational Contexts and Perspectives. Ed. Karsten Fitz. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2012. 163-177.
  • “‘Grüner Hügel’ und ‘Felsenbühne.’ Kulturtransfer in Richard-Wagner- und Karl-May-Festspielen.” Theater und Fest. Fest als Theater. Bayreuth und die moderne Festspielidee. Eds. Clemens Risi, Matthias Warstat, Robert Sollich, Heiner Remmert. Leipzig: Henschel, 2010. 180-197.
  • “Inszenierte Überlieferung – Theatralität und Gemeinschaft inKarl-May-Festspielen.” Karl May. Werk – Rezeption – Aktualität. Eds. Helmut Schmiedt, Dieter Vorsteher. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2009. 170-187.
  • “Why Dracula Cannot Die: The Invention of a Media-Legend.” Contemporary Legend 8, 2005. 1-17.
  • Vivifying the Uncanny: Ethnographic Mannequins and Exotic Performers in Nineteenth-Century German Exhibition Culture.” Fact and Fiction. Ed. Christine Lehleiter. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014. 38 pages. (accepted)