Zhiying Qian

Zhiying Qian

Contact Information

Position:
Assistant Professor
Office Location
Diffenbaugh 360
Program
Chinese
East Asian Languages and Cultures (MA)
Japanese
Linguistics
Office Hours

T & Th 11:00 - 12:00pm

Professor Qian (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) received her PhD in East Asian Languages and Cultures, with a certificate in Second Language Acquisition and Teacher Education, from UIUC in 2015. She specializes in psycholinguistics, second language acquisition, and language program management. Before joining Florida State University, she was the Chinese Program Coordinator at the University of Colorado Boulder. She has also learned Japanese at the Inter-University Center in Japan. Her research involves sentence processing by native speakers and second language learners of Chinese. She uses time-sensitive measures, such as eye-tracking and EEG, to investigate the moment-by-moment changes in the cognitive processes underlying language comprehension. Dr. Qian is currently working on three projects: 1) how contextual, syntactic and semantic information influences sentence comprehension by second language learners of Chinese, 2) how classifiers are processed in Chinese, Japanese, and English, and 3) whether and how vocal production training in music facilitates L2 acquisition of Mandarin lexical tones.

Research Interests

Psycholinguistics
Second Language Acquisition of Chinese
Sentence Processing

 

Courses Taught

Chinese Linguistics
History of East Asian Languages
Introduction to East Asian Linguistics
East Asian Language Pedagogy
Practical Issues in Chinese Language Pedagogy
All levels of Chinese language courses

 

Selected Publications

Journal Articles

  • Qian, Z., Lee, E-K., Lu, H-Y., & Garnsey, S. (in press, 2019). Native and non-native (L1-Mandarin) speakers of English differ in online use of verb-based cues about sentence structure. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition.
  • Qian, Z., Garnsey, S., & Christianson, K. (2018). A comparison of online and offline measures of good-enough processing in garden-path sentences. Language, Cognition, and Neuroscience, 33, 227-254.
  • Qian, Z., & Garnsey, S. (2016). A sheet of coffee: An event-related potential study on the processing of classifier-noun sequences in English and Mandarin. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 31, 761-784.
  • Packard, J., & Qian, Z. (2016). A working memory explanation for recency effects in Mandarin second language sentence processing. Journal of Chinese Teaching in the World, 30, 75-100.
  • Qian, Z., & Garnsey, S. (2015). Why do readers answer questions incorrectly after reading garden-path sentences? Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.