Courses Spring 2021

GER 1120 Elementary German I, multiple sections
GER 1120-02 (section 2) taught face-to-face.
For more information, contact: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GER 1121 Elementary German II, multiple sections
For more information, contact: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

Continuation of the introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.
Prerequisite: GER 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GER 2220 Intermediate German, multiple sections
For more information, contact: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: GER 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GET 3130 - Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries
Course meetings: Online synchronous, Tu/Thur, 3:05 - 4:20 pm
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

The course introduces students to masterpieces of German literature from the nineteenth century to the present. The authors of these works are of various ethnic, minority, and gender backgrounds. Their texts thematize representations of gendered or cultural Others and transcultural issues. By exploring these works and the issues they bring forth, the course enables students to develop critical competence in both literary analysis and diversity in Western (here: German) culture.

The course fulfills the following Liberal Studies requirements: Area IV Literature W and Cultural Practice Y. The course also offers credit for German majors and minors. This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.


GER 3310: Intermediate German Grammar
Course Meetings: Online synchronous, Tu/Th 11:35AM - 12:50PM
Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

The course is designed to increase and improve competence and proficiency in German grammar. This will be done through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation. Work in class involves exercises from the textbook, in-class conversation, web-based assignments, and written assignments. The course offers credit for German majors and minors.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent.


GER 3500 German Studies
Made in Germany: Ideas, Inventions, and Events in German Culture
Course meetings: 3:05-4:20 pm
Mon: Online synchronous, Wed: face-to-face
Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course, taught entirely in German, serves as an introduction to the study of German culture. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is put on increasing students' German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. Students will be also introduced to basic tools of literary analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent. This course is mandatory for the German major and also offers credit for minors.


GEW 4591/5595: Gastropoetics. Consumption and Excess in German Culture.
Course meetings: Online synchronous, Tu/Thu 4:50 - 6:05 pm
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

In this course, we will explore the aesthetics and ethics of consumption, dearth, and excess based on examples from German-speaking literature, culture, and film. Students will learn about the new field of 'Gastropoetics' through theoretical and literary readings and other cultural representations of German culinary culture. The discussion language is English and German texts are available in English translation. Students with a German studies background please expect a few readings in German. The course offers credit for German majors and minors.


GEW 4592/5596: Metamorphosis: The Poetic Life Sciences of Goethe and the Romantics
Course meetings: 4:50-6:05 pm
Mon: Online synchronous, Wed: face-to-face
Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course explores the relationship between science and poetry, between the quest for objective facts on the one and the imaginary flights to subjective fictions on the other end by studying scientific and poetic writings mostly from the long-Romantic period. At stake are fundamental questions: What is life? Where does life originate and how does it end? Can it be recreated? What is nature? What is science? These questions were asked and debated in the late 18th and early 19th centuries by scientists, philosophers, and poets alike. In fact, many scientists then were (also) poets, and many poets (also) scientists.

This course is for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. It is taught in English. Knowledge of German is required for undergraduate students. Interested graduate students from other disciplines can be accommodated and should please contact the instructor in advance. The course offers credit for German majors and minors.


GER 5940 Teaching Practicum
Course meetings: Wed 3:05-4:20 pm, face-to-face
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Email: aweber@fsu.edu


LING 4930: Language in Society
Course meetings: Online synchronous, Tu/Th 1:20PM - 2:35PM
Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Language is used to communicate across cultures. As such, language has been used to describe a process, a condition, a system, or a way to understand how we establish and maintain human contact. This course will examine concepts such as globalization & global culture, nationalism, language politics, language contact, diaspora, status, language socialization, metrolingualism, and social change in the context of language variation and identity.

For Internships and Directed Individual Studies, please contact the German program faculty directly.

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