Courses Spring 2019


GER 1120 – Elementary German I, multiple sections
For more information, contact:
Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130, GET 3524, and IFS courses taught in the German program.


GER 1120 – Elementary German II, multiple sections
For more information, contact:
Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

Prerequisite: GER 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130, GET 3524, and IFS courses taught in the German program.


GER 2220 – Intermediate German, multiple sections
For more information, contact:
Ray Hattaway
Office: DIF 316b
Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: GER 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130, GET 3524, and IFS courses taught in the German program.


GER 3310 – Intermediate German Grammar. A comprehensive review and practice of German language.
Course meetings: Tu/Th 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Classroom: DIF 116
Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: DIF 368
E-mail: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

The course offers a comprehensive intermediate program designed for students who have completed three semesters of college (or two years of high school) German. The course is designed to increase and improve competence and proficiency in German grammar. This will be done through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation. The primary objectives of this course are to strengthen and increase student’s previous abilities in the German language and to perfect competence and proficiency in German grammar. By reviewing previous grammar points and by adding more detailed explanations students will be able to work on the intermediary language level of language learning. This course will enhance student’s ability to use correct grammar and function in the German language (writing, speaking, listening) with greater confidence.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent.


GET 3130 - Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries
Course meetings: Tue/Th 11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Classroom: SAN 101
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Office: DIF 316
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

The course introduces students to masterpieces of German literature from the nineteenth century to the present. The authors of these works are of various ethnic, minority, and gender backgrounds. Their texts thematize representations of gendered or cultural Others and transcultural issues. By exploring these works and the issues they bring forth, the course enables students to develop critical competence in both literary analysis and diversity in Western (here: German) culture. 

The course fulfills the following Liberal Studies requirements: Area IV Literature W and Cultural Practice Y. The course also offers credit for German majors and minors. This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.


GER 3500 – German Studies: “Made in Germany: Ideas, Inventions, and Events in German Culture”
Course meetings: Mon/We/Fr 1:25 – 2:15 pm
Classroom: DIF 214
Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber
Office: DIF 316
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course, taught entirely in German, serves as an introduction to the study of German culture. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is put on increasing students’ German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. Students will be also introduced to basic tools of literary analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent. This course is mandatory for the German major.


GER 4480 – German of the News Media and Current Events
Course meetings: Mo/We/Fr 11:15 – 12:05 pm
Classroom: SAN 101
Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

The goals of this course are varied. In the course of the semester, the students will become familiar with current issues and events in Germany and be able to converse and write about them in German. The students will become acquainted with the system of mass media in Germany. Another objective of the course is to improve the students' language skills primarily reading, speaking, and listening through work with texts taken from the German mass media (newspapers, magazines, the internet, tv). Students will work with authentic, advanced-level texts from the media from a variety of sources on a variety of subjects. These texts will be the for discussion, role-playing, vocabulary and grammar practice, reports, and written assignments.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent.


GEW 5208 – Studies in a Genre/ GEW 4591 – Studies in an Author or Theme: “German Novellas of Realism”
Course Meetings: Tu/Th 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm
Classroom: DIF 109
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Office: DIF 316
Email:  aweber@fsu.edu

The photographic and historical “accuracy” to which we have grown so accustomed in contemporary culture has its origins in the aesthetics and literature of nineteenth-century Realism. The German novellas and short theoretical texts we discuss in this course will help us uncover how these expectations emerged in the nineteenth century. By engaging with the aesthetics and themes of German Realism, students will gain a better awareness of their own thinking and assumptions about ‘truth’ and ‘realness.’ Dual-language texts and adaptations of novellas to film will aid the comprehension and discussion of the literary works. In a variety of written and oral class activities and assignments, students will develop their critical and linguistic abilities. The course is taught in German with brief English discussions about theory.

Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission.


GET 5588 – Studies in a Theme: “The Ideas of ’68: Toward a Critique of Aesthetic Judgment and Political Action”
FOL 5934-05 / ENG 5049-01

Course meetings: Wed 3:35 – 6:30 pm
Classroom: WMS 204
Instructors: Dr. Barry Faulk, Dr. Christian Weber
Office: DIF 316
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

 “Paris, Berlin, Frankfurt, New York, Berkeley, Rome, Prague, Rio, Mexico City, Warsaw were the centers of a revolt that spread across the world and inspired the hearts and dreams of an entire generation” (Cohn-Bendit). The year 2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of these uprisings in which protesters felt united by their opposition against the Vietnam War, totalitarian political regimes of any type, fossilized traditions, patriarchal authorities, racial prejudice and sexual discrimination. This graduate seminar will explore the main ideas and intellectual influences that inspired student revolts throughout the Western hemisphere and motivated many ‘68ers to revolutionary action. Our discussions will focus on the philosophy, politics, literature, films, and other artistic events in the United States, Germany, and France. We also plan guest lectures on the intellectual, cultural, and political contexts of other nations during this exciting historical period whose effects reach into the contemporary sociopolitical and cultural climate of the world.

This graduate seminar is offered in parallel with the Winthrop-King conference “Does ‘la lutte continue’? The Global Afterlives of May ’68” hosted at FSU from March 28-30, 2019.

The seminar is conducted in English and open to students from all disciplines.


GET 5588 – Studies in a Theme and LIN 5932: “Language Planning”
Course meetings: Mo/Wed/Fr 1:25 – 2:15 pm
Classroom: DIF 116
Instructors: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu 

Language planning is the conscious effort to influence the function, structure, or acquisition of languages within a community. Language planning takes place at the intersection of politics, ideology, economics, and sociolinguistics. However, as a regulating instrument it is not often transparent to the public who the agency behind the engineering is: formal or informal agencies, committees, societies or academies? In whose interest is it to pursue language planning and for what reasons? We will explore issue on the micro- as well as macro-level moving between the analysis of words and the politics of language. The following issues will be explored: language education, prescriptivism that becomes normativism, national languages, language death, language revival and linguistic human rights to counteract language death. Students will learn to think critically, analyze language issues, and demonstrate awareness of how language communicates identity and interacts with culture. We will look at a variety of languages that have undergone language planning yet with different outcomes.

This course is taught in English.


IFS 3043: “German Society Through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity”
Course meetings: Tu 3:30 – 5:55 pm/ Th 3:35 – 4:45 pm
Classroom: BEL 209
Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: DIF 368
E-mail: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

This course explores cinematic responses to Nazi crimes against humanity in German society. Drawing on the perspectives of victims, perpetrators, bystanders, helpers, resisters, and members of subsequent generations, the course investigates how cultural memory is created to reveal a multiplicity of voices and to reflect on the indelible mark of the Nazi past in Germany. 

This course is taught in English. It is an E-Series Honors course, in addition if fulfills FSU’s Ethic and Social Responsibility and Cross-Cultural Requirement.


GER 5940: Teaching Practicum
For more information, contact:
 
Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: 
tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

 

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